Tuesday, November 20, 2018
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  • Authors Posts by Luke Vargas

    Luke Vargas

    Chief Foreign Correspondent

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    Luke Vargas is the Chief Foreign Correspondent for Talk Media News based at the United Nations headquarters in New York and reports on diplomacy, global elections and international development.

    Luke has spearheaded international coverage from 40 countries, relaying news to American audiences from Zika labs in Brazil, sprawling refugee camps in the Jordanian desert, military strategy rooms in Vietnam and the front lines of the Ukrainian revolution.

    A student of Eastern European and Russian history, Luke has traveled extensively across the former Soviet Union and frequently reports on Russian politics. Luke was among the first reporters to identify the political importance of the Crimean Peninsula during the 2014 Euromaidan revolution in Ukraine, and he reported from the port city of Sevastopol weeks before it became the focus of global attention.

    Luke got his start in journalism in high school, covering the 2008 presidential election in New Hampshire. His blogging coverage attracted the attention of local and national media outlets, and he began to make regular radio and television appearances from hundreds of campaign events around the country. Luke's  photography has been published by The New Yorker, CNN, Al-Jazeera and the Norwegian Nobel Committee. Luke continues to cover American elections and America's global place in the world.

    Luke is a frequent guest on the BBC, South African Broadcasting Company, CBS TV affiliates and radio stations around the world. Born in Boston, he currently lives in New Jersey and enjoys mountain biking, gardening and designing board games.

    Ahead of direct talks later this month, the U.S. and China used a summit in Papua New Guinea to promote their competing political and economic visions.

    Bangladesh says it won't force Rohingya Muslims back to Myanmar, where they were victims of ethnic cleaning last year. But is that really worth celebrating?

    The British Prime Minister is quickly running out of options, and time, to sell a sharply divided parliament on her Brexit plan.

    The British cabinet signs off on a draft Brexit deal, even as its prospects of passing the House of Commons are anything but certain.

    The New York Times called evidence of 13 undeclared missile sites evidence of a 'great deception' by North Korea. Others disagree.

    A new presidential directive forbids those entering the U.S. illegally from being able to seek asylum protections.

    "If you started using this technology in languages that are not spoken by most people in the world, it could be a big source of foreign influence."

    A lack of gender quotas and term limits, coupled with America's incumbency bias, means gender parity in Congress could still be decades off.

    In Suburban New Jersey, Staten Island and New York’s Hudson Valley, Democrats flipped a number of Republican seats to help propel a House takeover in D.C.

    Global issues like immigration and trade have infiltrated the midterm election discourse, repurposed by President Trump as domestic issues.