Pentagon transfers two Guantanamo detainees to Senegal

Pentagon transfers two Guantanamo detainees to Senegal

The men transferred are Salem Abdu Salam Ghereby, 55, and Omar Khalif Mohammed Abu Baker Mahjour Umar, who is 43 or 44.

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Guantanamo Bay detention center / Photo wikipedia

The men transferred are Salem Abdu Salam Ghereby, 55, and Omar Khalif Mohammed Abu Baker Mahjour Umar, who is 43 or 44.

WASHINGTON (Talk Media News) – The Pentagon said Monday that it transferred two Libyan Guantanamo inmates to Senegal as part of the Obama administration’s effort to close the detention center on the U.S. base in Cuba, bringing the number of detainees down to 89.

The men transferred are Salem Abdu Salam Ghereby, 55, and Omar Khalif Mohammed Abu Baker Mahjour Umar, who is 43 or 44.

Ghereby was allegedly a “former explosives trainer and veteran jihad fighter” who hosted Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG) fighters, according to military documents obtained by The New York Times.

Umar was allegedly a member of the LIFG leadership and an explosives and weapons trainer, according to military documents obtained by The New York Times.

Ghereby’s transfer was approved under an interagency Guantanamo Review Task Force established by executive order in 2009, and disbanded in 2010.

Umar’s transfer was approved under a Periodic Review Board established by executive order in 2011.

The Obama administration aims to send detainees back to their countries of origin, but under the 2016 defense policy act detainees are barred from transfer to active war zones — of which Libya is one.

“The United States appreciates the generous assistance of the Government of Senegal as the United States continues its efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility,” Secretary of State John Kerry said in a written statement.

The same legislation, the National Defense Authorization Act, bars the transfer of inmates to the U.S.

In February, President Barack Obama sent an ill-received Guantanamo closure plan to Congress that instructs that eligible detainees are transferred or prosecuted, and the remaining people are moved to an alternate site within the U.S. To execute the plan, Congress must pass new legislation that will allow the movement of detainees to the U.S.

Last week the Pentagon, which drafted the plan, said it does not an intend to alter it.

Obama made closing the facility a 2008 campaign promise.

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