Trump tells world only America’s ‘friends’ will receive foreign aid

Trump tells world only America’s ‘friends’ will receive foreign aid

By Luke Vargas   
Published
President Trump waves to the press as he enters the U.N. General Assembly hall. September 25, 2018. UN Photo/Rick Bajornas
President Trump waves to the press as he enters the U.N. General Assembly hall. September 25, 2018. UN Photo/Rick Bajornas

“Moving forward, we are only going to give foreign aid to those who respect us and, frankly, are our friends," Trump told the U.N. General Assembly.

UNITED NATIONS – President Trump staunchly defended some of his more controversial policies in remarks to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, telling heads of states that if they keep out of America’s business, they can expect America to do the same.

“I honor the right of every nation in this room to pursue its own customs, beliefs, and traditions. The United States will not tell you how to live or work or worship. We only ask that you honor our sovereignty in return.”

A lot has changed since Trump addressed the U.N. last year. In his own remarks, U.N. chief Antonio Guterres said one worrisome development is that too many leaders are failing to guard the common good.

And Trump could be seen to fit that bill.

His withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement leaves the U.S. as only country not supporting the landmark environmental deal – a point Trump didn’t acknowledge.

Days after slashing the U.S. refugee admissions cap, Trump said his refugee policies are instead driven by a desire to keep conflict-affected refugees near their homes so they can one day rebuild.

And after taking heat for policies separating migrant children from their parents at the US-Mexico border, Trump said his immigration crackdown is actually aimed at protecting migrants from exploitation.

“The United States is also working with partners in Latin America to prevent threats to sovereignty from uncontrolled migration. Tolerance for human struggling [sic] and human smuggling and trafficking is not humane.”

Trump – or aide Stephen Miller, who penned today’s speech – even gave this “no apology” ideology a name:

“America is governed by Americans. We reject the ideology of globalism. We embrace the doctrine of patriotism.”

And if countries want to criticize the U.S., Trump told them what to expect:

“Moving forward, we are only going to give foreign aid to those who respect us and, frankly, are our friends.”

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